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 Books On Older Processors 
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Joined: Sat Aug 03, 2013 11:02 pm
Posts: 43
I was at the bookstore a few days ago, and while looking for Perl books, I found a book on electronics. I opened it, and I found most of it was based on logic. However, later in the book, I found brief(but substantial) information on both the 8080 and the 6800. While not to much detail was covered, It listed the instruction set for both, and briefly covered address decoding and RAM for the two. I thought this was really cool, seeming that both the processors I am studying are mentioned in it, and that a book with info from the 70's was so accessible. :D

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Tue Feb 18, 2014 3:01 pm
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Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 6:54 pm
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Did you buy it? Did you get the author and title? I found this one on ebay:
Image

("Practical hardware details for 8080, 8085, Z80 and 6800 Microprocessor Systems" by James W Coffron. He wrote a number of similar titles: "Getting started with 8080, 8085, Z80, and 6800 microprocessor systems" is a 1984 Prentice-Hall.)

Cheers
Ed

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Tue Feb 18, 2014 9:13 pm
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Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2012 8:03 am
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Location: California
We used to have a lot of used-book stores locally 25 years ago. It was always fun to browse, and the prices were usually very good and I sometimes bought, always technical stuff. On two occasions in particular though, there were computer-related books that I thought they were asking too much for, so I did not buy them, and later I couldn't find them anymore, and I was kicking myself for years for not buying them. One was on math algorithms which I don't really need anymore now with the internet and also since our wonderful, tiny, computer-science daughter-in-law got me Jack Crenshaw's book "Math Toolkit for Real-Time Programming," but the other was a big one on computer history. I went back later and the shop had changed hands, and the new owner got rid of all the old computer books since they were outdated and he didn't think anyone would be interested. Excuse meee?? What is a used-book store for?? I still wish I had gotten more of such books, but it's nice now too that we can watch videos on computer history on YouTube. And even though the 6502 was introduced in its original form almost 40 years ago, we're still trying to catch up on documenting 6502 software methods (and maybe some hardware too)! There's so much more useful material to be written.

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http://WilsonMinesCo.com/ lots of 6502 resources


Wed Feb 19, 2014 1:45 am
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Joined: Fri Jan 10, 2014 11:19 pm
Posts: 25
They're not much good for browsing, but if you know a specific book you're looking for, try AbeBooks. I've had excellent luck finding classic computer books, such as Mead & Conway's Introduction to VLSI Systems, and Cody & Waite's Software Manual for the Elementary Functions (that one took a bit of waiting and watching). Often the books are amazingly cheap.

I admit, though, if you're not seeking a specific book, it's helpful to be able to browse. And often you'll find a good book that you might otherwise never have known about. Sadly, it's been many years since I lived near a good used book store with a technical section. (I did have a marvelous time at Powell's Books when on a visit to Portland, OR. I could have bought a hundred books if I'd had the money to spend, and the means to transport them.)

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Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:51 am
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Joined: Fri Feb 21, 2014 5:42 pm
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Location: Bristol, UK
If you're looking for programming books on the older 8-bit CPUs, I can recommend any of the series by Lance Leventhal. He wrote books on the 8080, 6800, 6502, 6809, 6800, Z80 and Z8000 (maybe others). They were all titled similarly, e.g. "6502 Assembly Language Programming" or "Z-80 Assembly Language Programming". The 6502 and 68000 books had second editions covering the 65C02 and 68010/68020, respectively. He also wrote books of assembly language subroutines for 8086, 6502, 6809 and 68000: "Assembly Language Subroutines for the 6809" and so on.

Other than those, we have any of the Sybex "Programming the 6052" series, which includes the 6502, 6809, Z80, 8088/8086, Z8000 and 68000.

All should be available via on-line used-book vendors, such as Abebooks mentioned above.


Fri Feb 21, 2014 6:27 pm
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Joined: Wed Apr 24, 2013 9:40 pm
Posts: 177
Location: Huntsville, AL
For me, the best source of information on most processors developed in the days before integrated circuits is bitsavers.org. There are archives of many of the processors of the 60s and 70s. In some cases, the archives have schematics for many of these computers.

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Fri Feb 21, 2014 7:50 pm
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Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2015 6:13 pm
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anachrocomputer wrote:
If you're looking for programming books on the older 8-bit CPUs, I can recommend any of the series by Lance Leventhal. He wrote books on the 8080, 6800, 6502, 6809, 6800, Z80 and Z8000 (maybe others).

Other than those, we have any of the Sybex "Programming the 6052" series, which includes the 6502, 6809, Z80, 8088/8086, Z8000 and 68000.


Ah yes, Lance Levanthal and Rodneys Zaks where the go to guys for programming books back in the day, in fact I have quite a few on the shelf above the desk I'm typing at and I always keep an eye on ebay for the ones I don't have.

Zaks 6502 was the first 'technical' book I ever purchased.


Sat Apr 18, 2015 8:21 pm
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Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 6:54 pm
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Muppz wrote:
Zaks 6502 was the first 'technical' book I ever purchased.

You know, I think the same might be true for me! I learnt some electronics fundamentals from the instructions to a Philips experimenter set, and from articles in Practical Electronics, but I did eventually buy a copy of Art of Electronics by Horowitz and Hill - it's spectacular, but not too big on microprocessors. My 1980 edition covers the fictitious MC-16 minicomputer and the 8085. The second edition seems to use a stripped-down 8086 and the 68008, and the third looks like it covers microcontrollers instead. I'm not sure if I'd recommend it now, unless you find it cheap.

Cheers
Ed


Sat Apr 18, 2015 8:53 pm
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